Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc



Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 6/17/2018

If you intend to list your house, it may be beneficial to perform home upgrades. That way, you can enhance your residence and increase the likelihood of generating plenty of interest in your house as soon as it becomes available.

Oftentimes, a home's roof will deteriorate over time. And if a home seller is not careful, he or she may be forced to repair or replace a house's roof prior to listing a residence. Because failure to update this home's roof may force a home seller to miss out on opportunities to maximize his or her home sale earnings.

For those who need help upgrading a home's roof, there is no need to worry. Many roofing contractors are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these professionals can help you update a home's roof in no time at all.

Differentiating a top-notch roofing contractor from an ordinary roofing contractor, however, sometimes can be difficult. Lucky for you, we're here to help you streamline the process of hiring the best-available roofing contractor in your city or town to update your house's roof.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you select the ideal roofing contractor.

1. Get Multiple Quotes

There is no shortage of roofing contractors at your disposal. Thus, you should receive quotes from multiple roofing contractors in your area.

Reach out to a variety of local roofing contractors – you'll be glad you did. In most instance, roofing contractors will offer free roof evaluations and estimates. Then, you can use the information provided by various roofing contractors to help you make an informed decision.

2. Ask Plenty of Questions

When it comes to selecting a roofing contractor, there is no such thing as a "bad" question. Therefore, you should ask a roofing contractor lots of questions to ensure you can make the best-possible choice.

Remember, roof repairs or updates may prove to be costly. But if you ask a roofing contractor for full details about a roof project, this professional can provide you with the insights you need to maximize the value of your investment.

3. Request Client Referrals

Generally, a roofing contractor can provide client referrals at a moment's notice. These referrals may prove to be exceedingly valuable, as they can help you understand what it's like to work with a roofing contractor before you make your final decision.

If you need extra help finding the right roofing contractor, you may want to reach out to a real estate agent as well. This housing market professional can put you in touch with the top roofing contractors in your city or town, ensuring you can get the home improvement support that you need.

Of course, a real estate agent can provide you with expert guidance throughout the home selling journey too. He or she can help you list your residence, promote it to the right groups of buyers and ensure you can enjoy a quick, profitable home selling experience.

Take the necessary steps to upgrade your home's roof – use the aforementioned tips, and you can hire a terrific roofing contractor before you add your residence to the housing market.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 6/10/2018

One recurring problem all parents deal with -- especially on weekends and school breaks -- is keeping their children entertained and engaged. (Sound familiar?)

While you can sometimes take your kids and their friends bowling, to the movies, or roller skating, those type of activities are only short-term fixes. Once you've expended all the possibilities, you're back to square one! The ideal scenario is to be able to fill in some of those gaps with fun, recreational activities at home.

If you have a finished basement or are talking about renovating an unfinished area, then that part of the house can provide the space for a dedicated rec room. The cost of finishing a basement can be expensive -- with estimates ranging from $10,000 to around $35,000. The final cost would depend on factors like the square footage of your basement, contractor pricing, materials used, and whether you're willing or able to do any of the work yourself. For growing families with active children, remodeling a basement or buying a house that already has a finished basement could prove to be a priceless resource for years to come!

Setting Up a Game Room

Outfitting a rec room with items like game tables is an additional expense that could have an impact on your budget. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to keep a lid on those costs. One idea would be to spread out those purchases over a period of time. For example, one year you could buy a billiards table; the next year, you could add a ping-pong table, air hockey game, or a foosball table to the room. Many of these items also make excellent birthday or holiday gifts for the kids, so you can potentially include those purchases in your gift-buying budget. With a little online price comparison, you'll also discover that you don't have to pay top dollar for any of those game tables. It's rarely necessary to get the "deluxe" version of a pool table, air hockey game, or foosball table, and there's a wide range of sizes and prices available -- both online and off. You may also stumble upon opportunities to buy used versions of those popular rec room games, and save a lot of money in the process.

Two inexpensive ways to expand the range of activities available in your recreation room (and keep your kids happy) is to stock up on board games and age-appropriate craft supplies. A television with a DVD player, popular channels, and video games is also sure to provide hours of entertainment on rainy days, school holidays, and unstructured weekends. Finished basements can also be a great place to host children's birthday parties, sleepovers, and club meetings. A TV in the basement can also help maintain family harmony. When the grownups want to watch one program and the kids want to watch something entirely different, you don't have to draw straws or pull rank!





Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 6/3/2018

As a first-time home seller, you may feel the need to make a counter-offer based on a homebuyer's initial proposal. However, if the homebuyer rejects your counter-offer, you may be forced to return to square one in your efforts to sell your house and obtain the best price for it.

A homebuyer's rejection of a counter-proposal is not the end of a home selling journey. And for home sellers who know how to proceed after a counter-proposal is rejected, they may be able to streamline the process of getting the optimal price for any residence, at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three tips that a first-time home seller can use to handle a rejected counter-proposal on his or her house.

1. Consider the Homebuyer's Perspective

Why did a homebuyer reject your counter-proposal? A first-time home seller should consider why a homebuyer decided to move on from a house after a counter-proposal was submitted and learn from the experience.

For example, if a home seller held firm on his or her home price, a homebuyer may have been unwilling to pay this amount. Thus, a home seller may want to consider lowering the price of his or her residence in to help stir up interest from large groups of potential homebuyers.

2. Review All of Your Options

A first-time home seller who submits a counter-proposal and receives a rejection from a homebuyer still has plenty of options, regardless of the current state of the housing market.

For instance, a home seller can keep the price of his or her house intact. Then, this home seller can await potential offers that match or exceed his or her expectations.

On the other hand, a home seller may choose to conduct assorted home improvements to upgrade his or her house's interior and exterior. These upgrades can make a world of difference in the eyes of homebuyers, and as a result, may make a home more attractive than other residences that are currently available.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a difference-maker for a first-time home seller, and for good reason. This housing market professional can offer expert guidance that a home seller may struggle to obtain elsewhere and ensure that a property seller can make informed decisions at each stage of the home selling journey.

With a real estate agent at your side, you can map out your next steps in the home selling journey accordingly.

Typically, a real estate agent will be able to tell you why a homebuyer rejected a counter-proposal on your residence. As such, you can learn from the experience and gain the insights you need to prevent the same problem from happening once again.

Selling a home can be difficult, particularly for those who have listed a residence for the first time. A real estate agent will help you take the guesswork out of selling your residence and do everything possible to ensure you can get the best possible price for your house.

Ready to overcome a rejected counter-proposal on your home? Use these tips, and you can proceed with confidence along the home selling journey.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 5/27/2018

Selling a home for the first time can be tricky. In fact, first-time home sellers often make mistakes that prolong the home selling process. Perhaps even worse, these errors may cause a home seller to miss out on opportunities to optimize the value of his or her residence.

Now, let's take a look at three common mistakes that first-time home sellers make, as well as ways to avoid these problems.

1. Setting an Unrealistic Initial Asking Price

Although you might have paid a hefty sum for your house a few years ago, what your home was worth then is unlikely to match its current value. However, if you set an unrealistic initial asking price for your residence, you risk alienating dozens of potential buyers.

Before you set a price for your house, it pays to perform plenty of housing market research. That way, you can see how your home stacks up against the competition and price it based on the current real estate sector's conditions.

Furthermore, you may want to conduct a home appraisal prior to listing your house. Following a home appraisal, you'll receive a property valuation to help you establish a competitive price for your residence.

2. Failing to Provide Full Details About Your House

No home is perfect, and a home seller who withholds information about his or her residence risks wasting precious time and resources. To better understand why this may be the case, let's consider an example.

If a home seller fails to include information about a faulty heating and cooling system in a home listing, a buyer will be unaware of the problem. A buyer then may submit an offer on this house that a seller accepts. But during a home inspection, a property inspector likely will discover the defective heating and cooling system, which leads the buyer to rescind his or her offer. And at this point, the seller will have to restart the home selling process from square one.

When it comes to selling a home, it helps to be honest. If you provide full details about your residence, you can help a buyer make an informed decision and reduce the risk of that a purchase agreement will fall apart after a home inspection.

3. Choosing an Ineffective Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent should have a seller's best interests in mind. As such, this housing market professional will collaborate with a seller throughout the home selling journey to ensure a seller can optimize his or her earnings.

Unfortunately, not all real estate agents possess the same skills. But if you evaluate a variety of real estate agents, you can increase the likelihood of finding one who matches or exceeds your expectations.

Employ a real estate agent with a proven reputation. And if you're uncertain about whether a real estate agent can help you achieve your home selling goals, it usually helps to request client referrals from this housing market professional.

Streamline the process of selling your home – avoid the aforementioned first-time home seller mistakes, and you can boost your chances of enjoying a quick, profitable home selling experience.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 5/20/2018

Owning a second home or vacation home is the dream of many Americans hoping to retire in style. However, owning a second home can also be a huge financial asset and even an added form of income if you’re savvy with the rental process.

What stops most of us from buying a vacation home in our ideal getaway? The funding, of course. But, there are ways to plan ahead to ensure you’ll be ready to take the plunge and purchase a second home when the time comes.

In today’s blog post, we’re going to be talking about the steps to buying a home away from home and give you some tip on how to accomplish this goal in the most financially-sensible way possible.

1.  Location is Key

When you buy a second home, you take on all the responsibilities of homeownership a second time. Since you won’t be around every day to tend to maintenance tasks and troubleshoot problems, you risk discovering costly repairs that could otherwise be avoided.

The most common issues to be concerned with are frozen pipes in northern climates, flooding in coastal areas, and problems like pests that can be found just about anywhere.

Depending on your budget, you might want a home you can drive out to on the weekends, meaning somewhere close by to your primary home. This option also makes it easier to stay up-to-date on home maintenance tasks before they become an issue.

2. Try before you buy

If your ideal vacation home is in an area you’re not totally familiar with, it’s a good idea to visit the neighborhood, talk to the locals, and gain their perspective on the area before buying.

This trip will also give you a sense of what you can expect to spend each time you visit the home. And, if you plan on renting out the property when you aren’t using it, you’ll be able to gauge what a reasonable rent price is for the location.

3. Earning income from your vacation home

Making extra cash from a home that you get to use pretty much whenever you want. Sounds like a dream, right? It can be if done properly, but you’ll need to ensure a few things before you can start earning income from your vacation property.

First, be aware that investment properties often require a larger down payment (typically 30%). Lenders also charge extra interest on homes that will be rented out.

Finally, there are local and state-level laws you’ll need to adhere to. These laws are designed to protect your interests as well as the people who rent out your property, so make sure you use a standard rental agreement for your area.

4. Making an offer

You’ve been here before. Once you’ve decided on a home, it’s time to start crafting your offer and negotiating with the seller’s agent.

However, before you pick a number, do some research on all of the expenses you’ll be paying on the house in question. Property taxes, homeowners association dues, utilities, and any other costs should be on your radar before determining if it’s the right home for your budget.

You’ll also want to be aware of the stipulations of renting out a property you own. This includes reporting income from renting your home to the IRS.


Now that you know the steps you’ll need to take to move toward your goal of buying a vacation home, you’ll be better equipped to make decisions that are best for you and your family’s future.